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Looking glass

I came, I saw, but Lord knows I ain't finished yet. Appear transparent. One love.

rometheworld:

What is Art?  (at Little Italy NYC)

rometheworld:

What is Art? (at Little Italy NYC)

(via certifieduniqueness)

"Security is elusive. It’s impossible. We all die. We all get old. We all get sick. People leave us. People change us. Nothing is secure."
- Eve Ensler (via feellng)

(via certifieduniqueness)

"Call your mother. Tell her you love her. Remember you’re the only person who knows what her heart sounds like from the inside."
- Wow this made me sad.  (via fuckoff-mondays)

(Source: pobredreamer, via lxrd-hvnzx)

Best part!

(Source: jim-carreys, via anothercleverjedimindtrick)

blackhistoryeveryday:

blackfeminism:

smithsonianfolklife:

The dap, the fist bump, the black power handshake. It goes by many names and carries many meanings. Photographer LaMont Hamilton is devoting his research fellowship with us to unearthing stories about the dap for his project Five on the Black Hand Side.
Read about the dap’s history and evolution on Talk Story: http://bit.ly/1odnKKM.

they called the “terrorist fist jab” on fox

The dap originated during the late 1960s among black G.I.s stationed in the Pacific during the Vietnam War. At a time when the Black Power movement was burgeoning, racial unrest was prominent in American cities, and draft reforms sent tens of thousands of young African Americans into combat, the dap became an important symbol of unity and survival in a racially turbulent atmosphere. Scholars on the Vietnam War and black Vietnam vets alike note that the dap derived from a pact black soldiers took in order to convey their commitment to looking after one another. Several unfortunate cases of black soldiers reportedly being shot by white soldiers during combat served as the impetus behind this physical act of solidarity.
Such events, combined with the racism and segregation faced by black G.I.s, created a pressing need for an act and symbol of unity. The dap, an acronym for “dignity and pride” whose movements translate to “I’m not above you, you’re not above me, we’re side by side, we’re together,” provided just this symbol of solidarity and served as a substitute for the Black Power salute prohibited by the military.
White soldiers and commanding officers deemed the handshake a threat under the misconception that the dap was a coded language of potential black insurrection. In fact the dap was also a coded form of communication between soldiers that conveyed necessary information for survival, such as what to expect at the battlefront or what had transpired during an operation. The dap was banned at all levels of the military, and thus many black soldiers were court-martialed, jailed, and even dishonorably discharged as a punishment for dapping. Military repression of the dap further cemented a desire for a symbol of solidarity and protection among black men.

blackhistoryeveryday:

blackfeminism:

smithsonianfolklife:

The dap, the fist bump, the black power handshake. It goes by many names and carries many meanings. Photographer LaMont Hamilton is devoting his research fellowship with us to unearthing stories about the dap for his project Five on the Black Hand Side.

Read about the dap’s history and evolution on Talk Story: http://bit.ly/1odnKKM.

they called the “terrorist fist jab” on fox

The dap originated during the late 1960s among black G.I.s stationed in the Pacific during the Vietnam War. At a time when the Black Power movement was burgeoning, racial unrest was prominent in American cities, and draft reforms sent tens of thousands of young African Americans into combat, the dap became an important symbol of unity and survival in a racially turbulent atmosphere. Scholars on the Vietnam War and black Vietnam vets alike note that the dap derived from a pact black soldiers took in order to convey their commitment to looking after one another. Several unfortunate cases of black soldiers reportedly being shot by white soldiers during combat served as the impetus behind this physical act of solidarity.

Such events, combined with the racism and segregation faced by black G.I.s, created a pressing need for an act and symbol of unity. The dap, an acronym for “dignity and pride” whose movements translate to “I’m not above you, you’re not above me, we’re side by side, we’re together,” provided just this symbol of solidarity and served as a substitute for the Black Power salute prohibited by the military.

White soldiers and commanding officers deemed the handshake a threat under the misconception that the dap was a coded language of potential black insurrection. In fact the dap was also a coded form of communication between soldiers that conveyed necessary information for survival, such as what to expect at the battlefront or what had transpired during an operation. The dap was banned at all levels of the military, and thus many black soldiers were court-martialed, jailed, and even dishonorably discharged as a punishment for dapping. Military repression of the dap further cemented a desire for a symbol of solidarity and protection among black men.

(via innateinferiorities)

-imaginarythoughts-:

verylilpimpin:

afrorevolution:

She is beautiful 😊😊

Omg

And they want you to admire them on white skin.

-imaginarythoughts-:

verylilpimpin:

afrorevolution:

She is beautiful 😊😊

Omg

And they want you to admire them on white skin.

(via eatmywordsswallowmycharisma)

"To my husband I will say:
You’re the proof that God answers prayers."
- Anne Nascn (via worshipgifs)

(via africanexistence)

memoriasconsazon:

i am from love
and i want love to pour into
and out of
everything i do

"Africa fed the world, but the world eats without Africa"
-

Dr. E. Obiri Addo (via ourafrica)

❗️❗️❗️❗️

(via fromzimbabwee)

(via innateinferiorities)

youngblackandvegan:

Do not allow people to mispronounce your name.

Still learning this…sadly

(via misztata)

God, it took me so long to be comfortable in the person I am and the person I’m becoming.
To be able to own this temple in which I temporarily inhabit without conviction.
No shame in stating I’m a virgin at the age of 22, that I rather chill out than party, that I find solace in my own silence rather than in a room full of people. At the fact that I’m perfectly fine being single and my singleness does not dictate to my happiness. See I’m not looking for but one love and that’s the love of the Almighty and if a man shows himself and loves He more than me, then I’ll be interested, but until then I’m chilling. These are attributes of myself that I’ve come to love and will not be condemned for such.

1 week ago 4 notes

Tagged with:  #personal

"She who knows life flows, feels no wear or tear, needs no mending or repair."
- John Green (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via naturalwisdom3)

kemetmademelanininmyblood:

giancarlovolpe:

ladyinterior:

Magnificent Trees Around the World

If you ever work with me you’ll know how much I hate lollipop-shaped-for-shorthand-trees. 

Beautiful

Old school by Chaela19 on Grooveshark>